Category: Environment

Vietnam’s taste for cat leaves pets in peril

28 July, Hanoi (AFP): The enduring popularity of “little tiger” as a snack to accompany a beer in Vietnam means that cat owners live in constant fear of animal snatchers, despite an official ban. At an unassuming restaurant next to a carwash in central Hanoi, a cat is prepared for hungry clients: drowned, shaved and burned to remove all fur before being cut up and fried with garlic. “A lot of people eat cat meat. It’s a novelty. They want to try it,” said the establishment’s manager To Van Dung, 35. Vietnam has forbidden the consumption of cats in...

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Dinosaurs’ extinction ‘bad luck’

28 July, London: Dinosaurs were wiped out by an asteroid impact when they were at their most vulnerable, according to a new study. Dr Steve Brusatte, of Edinburgh University, said sea level rises and volcanic activity had made many species more susceptible to extinction. They might have survived if the asteroid had hit the Earth a few million years later or earlier, he said, calling it “colossal bad luck”. The assessment has been published in the journal, Biological Reviews. “It was a perfect storm of events that occurred when dinosaurs were at their most vulnerable,” Dr Brusatte told BBC...

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12,000 saplings planted at Deutibajyai community forest

28 July, Surkhet: Around 12,000 saplings of different species have been planted at Deutibajyai Community Forest at Latikoili VDC in Surkhet district. The Deutibajyai Community Forest Users’ Group, Latikoili, and Sub-Committee, Charkune, jointly planted the saplings at different period. The forest lies at chure area. Saplings of different species including neem, pinus roxburghii and bamboo were planted at the forest area. Forest Users’ Committee Chairman Bhim Bahadur Khatri said the District Forest Office and District Soil Conservation Office provided the saplings for the same. Saplings were planted at Chakune, Chaukhedhung and Simalkuna of the forest area at the same...

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Nepal awarded for reducing rhino poaching

12 July, Kathmandu: Nepal has been awarded from CITES Secretary-General’s Certificates of Commendation for its exemplary wildlife law enforcement efforts. The Secretary-General of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), Mr John E. Scanlon, provided the award at an International Consortium on Combating Wildlife Crime (ICCWC) event taken place as part of the 65th meeting of the CITES Standing Committee held in Geneva, Switzerland, on 7-11 July. The CITES Secretary-General’s Certificate of Commendation was awarded to Nepal in recognition of its exemplary efforts to combat wildlife crime. In 2011 no rhinoceroses, tigers,...

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Government unveils many programs for forest conservation and bio-diversity

Kathmandu, June 29: The government has come up with a national campaign of ‘one home one tree, one village one forest and one city many parks’ by announcing forest decade for the protection of forest and bio-diversity. At the policy and program for the fiscal year 2014-15 tabled by the government at the Legislature-Parliament Sunday, the government has brought out the program involving common people in afforestation and forest conservation. In order to ensure the access of all communities to forest resources, community, collaborative and leasehold forest programs will be further expanded, states the government’s policy document unveiled by...

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Minister vows locals’ participation in Chure conservation

21 June, Kathmandu: Minister for Forest and Soil Conservation Mahesh Acharya has pledged to ensure local’s maximum participation for the conservation of the Chure region. Speaking at an interaction program at Reporters’ Club on Saturday, Minister Acharya said the government was implementing an integrated environment conservation program on a campaign basis for the protection of the Chure region which is geologically fragile and is also at high risk of earthquake. The Minister for Forest underlined the need of collective commitment for the conservation of the Chure belt as it is under threat due to the over-exploitation and also because...

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Study: 20,000 elephants poached in Africa in 2013

15 June, Geneva (AP) — More than 20,000 elephants were poached last year in Africa where large seizures of smuggled ivory eclipsed those in Asia for the first time, international wildlife regulators said Friday. Eighty percent of the African seizures were in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, three of the eight nations required to draw up plans to curb ivory smuggling, officials with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) reported. The report says poaching is increasing in Central African Republic, but declining in Chad. But CITES, which regulates 35,000 species of plants...

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Maneater leopard murdered in Arghakhanchi

12 June, Arghakhanchi: Police have murdered a man-eater leopard at Sandhikharkha Municipality-1 in Arghakhanchi district following the locals’ complaints.According to the locals, four babies were murdered at Sandhikharkha and adjoining villages by the leopard only in the last year.   Police said that the leopard was killed after the locals filed an application asking to murder the man-eater. The district police office had mobilized a team under the command of Deputy Superintendent of Police Dipendra GC to rein in the man-eater leopard.  ...

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Nepal’s leasehold forestry program to get continuity

11 June, Kathmandu: The Ministry of Forest and Soil Conservation is to give continuity to the leasehold forestry program under the community-based forests management scheme. Minister for Forests and Soil Conservation Mahesh Acharya gave this information speaking at a program on the leasehold forests. He disclosed that the leasehold forest program is to be expanded by means of the forthcoming policy and program of the government. The Department of Forests (DoF) is currently implementing the community based forests management program in 26 districts with the financial and technical support of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the...

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Rising Sea Levels Are Exposing Bodies of Buried WWII Soldiers

8 June: During United Nations-sponsored climate change talks in Germany, the foreign minister of the Marshall Islands said 26 skeletons of World War II soldiers washed up after their graves were exposed by rising sea levels. Said Foreign Minister Tony de Brum: There are coffins and dead people being washed away from graves— it’s that serious. Even the dead are affected.” The soldiers are believed to be Japanese. The Marshall Islands are particularly precarious in their perch; the nation, made up of 29 atolls, is roughly just six feet above sea level. With sea levels predicted to rise by three-to-six feet by...

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