Category: Health

Stress isn’t hot, study shows

Stress makes its mark on the female face, according to a new study that finds men judge women with high levels of a stress hormone less attractive. The finding is a gender turnaround on previous research that has found that women go for low-stress guys, too. Stress can suppress fertility, said study researcher Markus Rantala, a professor of biology at the University of Turku in Finland. Thus, Rantala said, it’s no surprise that both men and women might have evolved to prefer chilled-out faces. But the new study does suggest one intriguing gender difference: Men weren’t more attracted to...

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Could marijuana reduce diabetes risk?

17 May, There’s an unexpected link between marijuana use and factors related to Type 2 diabetes that has medical researchers intrigued. Several studies have found that marijuana users take in more food calories than nonusers, but they still have lower rates of obesity and diabetes, and lower average body mass index (BMI) levels. In a new study, researchers investigated what effects marijuana and its active ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) might have on people’s metabolism, especially insulin levels. [5 Diets That Fight Diseases] Insulin resistance an important risk factor for diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when the body’s cells...

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Hookahs no safer than cigarettes

‘Hookahs’ expose people to higher levels of carbon monoxide and benzene, researchers say. People who smoke tobacco through a water pipe, also known as a hookah, are still exposing themselves to a harmful mix of toxins, according to a small new study. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), cautioned that water pipes are not less harmful than cigarettes. And those who use a water pipe appear to face higher levels of carbon monoxide and benzene, which has been linked to increased risk for leukemia. “People want to know if it is a lesser health risk if...

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US researchers make embryonic stem cells from skin

16 May, Washington: US researchers have reported a breakthrough in stem cell research, describing how they have turned human skin cells into embyronic stem cells for the first time. The method described Wednesday by Oregon State University scientists in the journal Cell, would not likely be able to create human clones, said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, senior scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. But it is an important step in research because it does not require the use of embryos in creating the type of stem cell capable of transforming into any other type of cell in the body....

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WHO says new coronavirus may be passed person to person

The World Health Organization says it appears likely that the novel coronavirus (NCoV) can be passed between people in close contact. 13 May, Europe: This comes after the French health ministry confirmed a second man had contracted the virus in a possible case of human-to-human transmission. Two more people in Saudi Arabia are also reported to have died from the virus, according to health officials. NCoV is known to cause pneumonia and sometimes kidney failure. World Health Organization (WHO) officials have expressed concern over the clusters of cases of the new coronavirus strain and the potential for it to...

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Deadly virus spreads to France

Deadly SARS-like virus spreads to France as Australia develops test for H7N9 12 May, A SECOND person has contracted a deadly new SARS-like virus in France after sharing a hospital ward with the first victim. The virus, known as nCoV-EMC, is a cousin of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which triggered a scare 10 years ago when it erupted in east Asia. Then it moved to humans from animal hosts and killed 800 people. The latest victim shared a hospital room with a 65-year-old man who is in intensive care in the northern town of Lille. The virus has...

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Could Bacteria Be the Future to Fighting Malaria?

10 May. Michigan: The best way to beat a bug may be with another bug. New research suggests that a certain strain of bacteria that can infect mosquitoes and make them resistant to the malaria parasite, thereby preventing the spread of malaria to humans before it starts. Malaria is spread between people by the –so it is believed that giving mosquitoes malaria immunity would reduce human cases. The study, published in the journal Science, showed that the malaria parasite had difficulty surviving in mosquitoes infected with certain strains of bacteria. Although the study is promising in theory, experts in...

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Reverse aging? Scientists discover protein that could turn hearts younger

10 May, No matter how young an individual may feel at heart, little can currently be done to counteract the effects of natural cardiovascular aging. As an adults ages, his or her heart grows larger and its walls thicken, often leading to a disease known as diastolic heart failure. This is the most common form of age-related heart failure and despite the fact that it affects millions, there is no known treatment. However, in a breakthrough discovery, researchers at Harvard University have pinpointed a protein that, when injected into the blood of mice, is able to reverse aging in...

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A vaccine for herpes? Researchers discover immune cells that suppress HSV-2 infection

Genital herpes is one of the most common types of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the United States – as well as one of the most frustrating. Characterized by periodic blisters on the genitals, rectum or mouth, there is currently no cure for the disease, and it can only be managed by antiviral medications which help shorten outbreak periods. However, a new study may provide hope for those suffering from this STI. Researchers have identified a subtype of immune cells that suppress outbreaks of genital herpes caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). The discovery could lead...

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Breast milk can prevent intestinal problem in babies

7 May, Washington: An ingredient that naturally occurs in breast milk might be used to prevent premature babies from developing a deadly intestinal condition that currently is largely incurable, a new study has revealed. The story begins with a baby who is born too early, meaning before 36 weeks gestation, said senior author David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., Watson Family Professor of Surgery, Pitt School of Medicine, and co-director of the Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment Center at Children`s Hospital. Once stable, typically the baby is fed with formula because often breast milk is not readily available to premature infants. “Within...

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